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Laboratory technician (Conservation genetics)

Location:   Royal Zoological Society of Scotland – Edinburgh Zoo             

About Us: The charity that owns both RZSS Edinburgh Zoo and RZSS Highland Wildlife Park are looking for a committed, compassionate and conservation-minded individual to join our WildGenes team. RZSS aims to connect people with nature and safeguard species from extinction, a mission that sees us work both here in Scotland and in over 20 countries around the world. From inspiring the next generation about wildlife in our parks to protecting chimpanzees in the Ugandan rainforest; looking after some of the world’s most endangered species to saving the Scottish wildcat, RZSS is making a huge difference and we need your help to continue to grow. 

The role: An opportunity has arisen for a committed Laboratory technician (Conservation Genetics) to join the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s WildGenes lab. Reporting to the Conservation Programme Manager (WildGenes), the technician will plan, co-ordinate and perform lab work for delivery of genetic data associated with a wide portfolio of conservation projects. The role requires the holder to maintain a high-quality laboratory environment for the conservation science programme, to agreed standards under appropriate guidance and direction, in support of RZSS’s vision and mission. It is a full-time permanent role working 37.5 hours per week. 

Who we are looking for: The successful candidate will hold a BSc in a biological discipline plus job experience in a relevant scientific role. They will need knowledge of standard molecular genetic laboratory techniques, be able to communicate with a range of project partners including scientific and applied conservation organisations, experience of DNA extraction and PCR based molecular genetic techniques. 

Interested? For full information on how to apply, please visit the RZSS vacancy page and follow the instructions: http://www.rzss.org.uk/job-vacancies/ 

Closing date:      Sunday 25th July 2021.  

Invitation to interview will be by email/phone and interviews will take place during the 1st/2nd week of August. 

For any questions and queries, please email Dr Alex Ball at aball@rzss.org.uk quoting “Laboratory technician” as the subject. 

Our mission is to connect people with nature and safeguard species from extinction. The RZSS strives to be an equal opportunities employer. Registered Charity SC00406 

Accommodation needed for August-November


Hi all, I am a Bristol PhD student visiting the molecular ecology lab from late August to late November this year and I’m looking for somewhere to stay. I’m hoping to find a double room for myself and my partner who is a software developer currently working from home. We are friendly people who like board games, bouldering and cooking amongst other things! Ideal location would be relatively close to both the university and the train station. Please get in touch if you know of anything suitable (nicholas.tew@bristol.ac.uk). Cheers, Nick

Free ESEB online satellite symposium: How have biomarkers improved our understanding of the evolution of senescence?

  • Abstract submission and registration deadline extended until Friday June 4th
  • Abstract submissions are invited for 10 min talks and for posters.
  • Symposium will take place 6-7 July 2021: talks, 12:30-16:30 CEST; posters, evening of 6th July


As individuals reach older ages their bodies deteriorate – a process known as senescence. Individuals within the same species can differ greatly in the age they start to senesce, and the rate at which they senesce. However, why individuals senesce so differently remains unresolved and is one of the biggest unanswered questions in evolutionary biology. Understanding the drivers of senescence has important ramifications for veterinary medicine, conservation, health and society, as it could help individuals to live longer, healthier lives. This symposium will seek to address this knowledge gap by bringing together researchers with expertise in senescence from theoretical, laboratory and field settings. In particular it will focus on how our understanding of health and the evolution of senescence has been altered with the development of indicators and biomarkers of senescence such as epigenetic clocks and telomeres. These biomarkers have shed light on the relative impact of social, environmental, genetic and trans-generational effects on senescence. A synthesis of advances in the evolutionary theory of senescence, the occurrence and life-history consequences of senescence, and the underlying genetic and non-genetic mechanisms driving variation in individual senescence will significantly further the field. This knowledge is vital to understanding why senescence has evolved and how variance is maintained.

Invited speakers:

  • Emma Teeling, University College Dublin
  • Katharina Gapp, ETH Zurich
  • Jenny Tung, Duke University

Organisers: 

  • Hannah Dugdale, University of Groningen
  • Julia Schroeder, Imperial College London
  • Alex Sparks, University of Leeds

Abstract submission: through the ESEB website https://www.eseb2021.cz/en/satellite-symposia-2021
Registration: free of charge, through the ESEB website https://www.eseb2021.cz/en/satellite-symposia-2021

Advert for Research Scientist position

Advert for Research Scientist position

Research Scientist – (3 years Fixed Term)

Location:   Royal Zoological Society of Scotland – Edinburgh Zoo             

About UsThe charity that owns both RZSS Edinburgh Zoo and RZSS Highland Wildlife Park are looking for committed, compassionate and conservation-minded individuals to join our expert staff team. RZSS aims to connect people with nature and safeguard species from extinction, a mission that sees us work both here in Scotland and in over 20 countries around the world. From inspiring the next generation about wildlife in our parks to protecting chimpanzees in the Ugandan rainforest; looking after some of the world’s most endangered species to saving the Scottish wildcat, RZSS is making a huge difference and we need your help to continue to grow. 

The roleAn opportunity has arisen for a committed Research Scientist (Conservation Genetics) to join the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland’s WildGenes lab. Reporting to the Conservation Programme Manager (WildGenes), the Research Scientist will assist with the analysis of applied conservation genetic research data delivered by the RZSS WildGenes laboratory. 

Who we are looking forThe successful candidate will have a PhD in a relevant genetics discipline such as Conservation Genetics or Population Genetics/Genomics and a desire to work as part of our team to support conservation projects around the globe. 

Interested?For full information on how to apply, please visit the RZSS vacancy page and follow the instructions: http://www.rzss.org.uk/job-vacancies/ 

Closing date:      Monday 18th January 2021.  

Invitation to interview will be by email/phone and interviews will take place during the 2nd week of February. 

For any questions and queries, please email Dr Alex Ball at aball@rzss.org.uk quoting “Research Scientist” as the subject.

ring found in women’s bathroom (Perak labs)

brought to Porters (Alfred Denny)

1-yr Research Fellow in the Evolution of Senescence, U Leeds

http://jobs.leeds.ac.uk/FBSBY1077

Programming for Evolutionary Biology conference, 16-20 Sept 2017, Biolowieza, Poland

The dealine for 3rd Programming for Evolutionary Biology
Conference 16-20 Sept 2017, Bialowieza, Poland has been extended. We
now accept abstracts till 31st July.

The Programming for Evolutionary Biology (PEB) conference brings
together biologists broadly interested in applying bioinformatic tools
to answer evolutionary and ecological questions.

It aims to serve as a platform for discussing the ongoing projects and
related bioinformatic pitfalls. The meeting consists of plenary talks
by renowned specialists in the field, contributed talks by the
participants (works in progress are more than welcome!) and workshops.

This year, we are fortunate to be joined by an outstanding list of
Plenary Speakers: Mark Blaxter from University of Edinburgh, Stuart
Baird from Czech Academy of Sciences, Katja Nowick from University of
Leipzig. The workshops will be provided by Przemyslaw Biecek, a data
scientist and R enthusiast from University of Warsaw.

The fee, including meals, accommodation, and transportation from
Warsaw airport and back, is 250 euro.

More info: pebconference.info

Looking forward seeing you in Bialowieza!

On behalf the organising committee,
Agnieszka Kloch

P.S. Abstracts are not required for registration. In case you don’t know, the Bialowieza Forest lies at the border to Belarus and is one of Europe’s last primaeval forests. It is still a UNESCO world heritage site, but currently threatened by a logging campaign. The conference venue is the WEJMUTKA Bialowieza Biodiversity Academy, which lies in the centre of the national park.

2 funded PhDs on Seychelles warblers

Individual variation in reproductive success in the cooperatively breeding Seychelles warbler

Biomarkers of senescence in the Seychelles warbler

Funded PhD on ageing in badgers, U Leeds

A funded PhD studentship on “Early-life environment effects on ageing in European badgers” is available at the University of Leeds, UK, supervised by Dr Hannah Dugdale and co-supervised by Dr Amanda Bretman. The PhD is in collaboration with Prof David Macdonald and Dr Chris Newman at the University of Oxford.

This PhD will address why individuals differ in the point and rate at which they senesce – senescence being the loss of function with age, from the cellular to the organism level. Our understanding of the factors that affect senescence is limited: Within a species, are some individuals better able to buffer against senescence due to physiological adaptations (such as greater oxidative damage resistance and longer protective chromosome caps – termed telomeres), environmental effects (e.g. born in years with high food availability), or social conditions (e.g. low levels of intra-sexual competition)? This PhD will investigate these key questions, using data from a natural population of European badgers subject to variable environmental and social conditions. This will generate critical knowledge that will improve our understanding of how and why some individuals live longer, healthier lives than others, improving our understanding of animal health and informing conservation management decisions. Further information is available here: https://hannahdugdale.wordpress.com/opportunities

Funding: The studentship covers UK/EU tuition fees and a stipend at RCUK rates (~£14,296 pa) for 3 years full-time. Applicants from the UK/EU are eligible; international tuition fee payers are not eligible. Deadline: Friday, April 29, 2016. To apply: http://www.fbs.leeds.ac.uk/postgraduate/researchdegree.php

Funded PhD on senescence in European badgers, U Leeds

Early-life environment effects on telomere dynamics in European badgers

Lead supervisor: Dr Hannah Dugdale (U Leeds)
Co-supervisors: Dr Amanda Bretman (U Leeds), Prof David Macdonald (U Oxford), Dr Chris Newman (U Oxford)

Death is inevitable, but the quality of life prior to death varies enormously. This is because individuals differ in the point and rate at which they senesce – senescence being the loss of function with age, from the cellular to the organism level. Our understanding of the factors that affect senescence is limited: Within a species, are some individuals better able to buffer against senescence due to physiological adaptations (such as greater oxidative damage resistance and longer protective chromosome caps – termed telomeres), environmental effects (e.g. born in years with high food availability), or social conditions (e.g. low levels of intra-sexual competition)? This PhD project will investigate these questions, using data from a natural population subject to variable environmental and social conditions. This will generate critical knowledge that will improve our understanding how and why some individuals live longer, healthier lives than others, potentially contributing to both human and animal health interventions.

This PhD has the exciting opportunity to use long-term data from a wild population of European badgers in Wytham Woods, Oxford, UK. These badgers live in social groups of variable size that on average have six adult males and six adult females. Within this population female badgers show an earlier onset and a shallower rate of reproductive senescence than males, but it is not clear why these sex differences in senescence occur. In another UK badger population, sex differences in somatic senescence rates have been linked to the level of intra-sexual competition that individuals experience in the first two years of adulthood. It is also apparent that stressful environmental conditions in early life, such as low food availability and exposure to disease, can accelerate senescence. This PhD will therefore use telomeres as a bio-molecular measure of senescence, in relation to somatic, actuarial and reproductive senescence. This is important as we currently have very little understanding of how both the onset and the rate of senescence, from the bio-molecular to reproductive levels, are influenced by environmental conditions.

The student wil