Monthly Archives: March 2013

Mol Ecol meeting next Tuesday (2 April), 10-11am, B52

Hi all!

please make sure you remember to come back to work on Tuesday after your Easter holiday, as we have two great talks this month:

Isabel Douterelo: Pipe Dreams: Bacterial Diversity in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

Ben Jackson:The effects of natural selection on patterns of genetic diversity

See you there!
Anna :)

2 Postdoctoral Scientist Positions – Minnesota

2 Postdoctoral Scientist Positions – Minnesota

Deer-Moose Parasite Transmission Project
The Minnesota Zoo seeks a dedicated postdoctoral scientist, referred to as a Project Specialist, to conduct lead work for a collaborative project to investigate and model parasite transmission dynamics between white-tailed deer, moose, and other vectors in northeastern Minnesota. The incumbent will work with collaborators to design and conduct the scientific study. Project activities will include placing tracking collars on white-tailed deer in areas where moose are also being tracked, mapping and monitoring deer movements remotely, collecting field data from areas used by deer and/or moose, and possibly field/laboratory identification of parasites. The postdoctoral scientist will then analyze project data, create a parasite transmission model that incorporates project data, and submit a minimum of two project-related scientific manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals within the time frame for this position.
The primary goal of the deer-moose parasite transmission project is to help wildlife managers in Minnesota better understand and respond to the recent sharp decline in the State’s moose population. The postdoctoral scientist is also expected to meet with and present the project’s findings to appropriate wildlife managers in the State. He/she will also prepare and/or deliver articles, website material, and presentations to/for both scientific and general audiences.

Wolf-Moose Predation Project
The Minnesota Zoo seeks a dedicated postdoctoral scientist, referred to as a Project Specialist, to conduct lead work for a collaborative project to investigate wolf-moose interactions, including habitat use overlap and the impacts of wolf predation on moose in northeastern Minnesota. The incumbent will work with collaborators to design and conduct the scientific investigation. Project activities will include placing tracking collars on wolves in areas where moose are also being tracked, mapping and monitoring wolf pack movements remotely, locating predation sites, and collecting field data from these sites. The postdoctoral scientist will then analyze project data and submit a minimum of two project-related scientific manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals within the duration of this position.
The primary goal of the wolf-moose predation project is to help wildlife managers in Minnesota better understand and respond to the recent sharp decline in the State’s moose population. The postdoctoral scientist is expected to meet with and present the project’s findings to appropriate wildlife managers in the State. He/she will also prepare and/or deliver articles, website material, and presentations to/for both scientific and general audiences.
General conditions for both positions
Additional duties may include assisting with a second project investigating wolf-moose interactions and predation in northeastern Minnesota. He/she will assist with field work and data collection, and may also assist with data analysis and/or manuscript preparation.
These projects are conducted in partnership with Dr. Ron Moen, Research Associate at the Natural Resources Research Institute (NRRI). The positions will be located primarily at NRRI in Duluth, Minnesota.
Employees in these positions will work up to a (maximum) of three years.
Positions ares contingent upon funding and successful candidates will be hired once the funding is secured.
Days and hours of work will vary depending on the needs of the position.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
-Ph.D. (in-hand at time of appointment) in Conservation Biology, Ecology, Wildlife Management, Wildlife Epidemiology, or other related field.
-Ability to conduct field work independently and year-round in remote areas of northeastern Minnesota. Previous field experience is required.
-Experience in empirical research design and methodology, with appropriate academic skills to publish results in peer-reviewed scientific journals.
-High level of proficiency in Geographic Information Systems (ArcGIS), Microsoft Office software, and statistical analysis software, and R programming language.
-Experience with spatially-explicit modeling techniques (preferably epidemiological modeling).
-Knowledge of host-parasite transmission dynamics in wildlife communities.
-Experience analyzing and manipulating large data sets.
-Excellent communication skills, including the ability to create and deliver high-quality presentations to both scientific and general audiences.
-Excellent time management skills, as demonstrated by time to completion of Ph.D. or number of peer-reviewed articles published since completion of Ph.D., for example.
Job is contingent on a valid D drivers license and background check.

PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS:
-Ph.D. conferred within the past five years.
-One or more previous first-author publications in peer-reviewed scientific journals, with number of publications commensurate with time since Ph.D. was conferred.
-Previous field experience in conditions similar to those present in northeastern Minnesota.
-Previous experience studying predator-prey dynamics.
-Ability to identify prey species based on remains found at predation sites.
Previous experience with and/or knowledge of wolves and/or moose will be viewed favorably but weighted less than other qualifications.

START DATE: approximately July 15, 2013

POSITION LOCATION: primarily Duluth, MN, with field work in northeastern MN
SALARY: $18.46/hour, $38,544 annually
EMPLOYMENT CONDITION: Temporary unclassified
TRAVEL: required

APPLICATION DEADLINE: April 17, 2013

HOW TO APPLY:
Please review the following requirements to ensure your application is complete. Failure to provide the requested documents will result in your application not being considered.

To apply, submit your resume online by April 15, 2013. Go towww.careers.state.mn.us to create a profile and apply to the job (posting number 13mzg000057).

In addition to your resume, you must email or mail the following with a subject headline of Project Specialist Materials:
-Cover letter
-Unofficial graduate school transcript (official transcript to be supplied upon request)
-2-page (maximum) statement of qualifications (please list and describe how you meet each and every minimum qualification; also list and describe how you meet all relevant preferred qualifications)

Please send additional materials to the Minnesota Zoo Human Resources by emailHuman.Resources.mnzoo@state.mn.us  or by mail with a subject headline of Project Specialist Materials:

Minnesota Zoo
Attn: Human Resources
Project Specialist Materials
13000 Zoo Blvd.
Apple Valley, MN 55124
All additional materials must be received by 5:00 pm on Monday, April 17, 2013
MORE INFORMATION ON THE MINNESOTA ZOO:www.mnzoo.org

bioinformatics job at Pirbright Institute

Hi all,
a job advert for a bioinformatician from Mark Gibson (who attended the Intro to Genomics workshop) at the Pirbright Institute. The salary has been revised to include a London weighting so it is now £38,282.

http://pirbright.ac.uk/jobs/PDFDisplayPage.aspx?id=25

Anna :)

post doc- speciation

My master’s advisor is hiring a post doc to do some speciation work. The link is below:

Thanks,

Aaron 

Terry’s group meeting – tomorrow 12pm B52

Japanese stickleback talk TODAY by Mark

as indicated in the previous post, so just a reminder, noon in B52 Mark Rivenet, who attended the genomics workshop, will give a 30 minute talk on the curious Japanese stickleback – the only ones to exhibit intrinsic hybrid inviability and some odd courtship behavior. All are welcome. cheers, Patrik

Leaving drinks on Thursday 28th

Hello all!

As you may know, I am leaving the department at the end of the month to start a new job. Julia and Matt will also be leaving at the end of the month, and since it is Easter weekend, Thursday 28th will be the last working day. All three of us would absolutely love you all to join us for some drinks and fun in the Interval, from around 5pm onwards (although we may be tempted to go a little earlier).

Hope to see you all there! (Or else!)

Jen

Introduction to Genomics workshop, Tuesday and Wednesday – please look out for our guests!

Hi all!
As many of you will know we are holding an Introduction to Genomics workshop next week in the IT centre (the one way down in the dungeon near the lecture theatres and Perak labs). We are expecting around 25 people from outside Sheffield to attend and (given the impossibility of finding the IT centre) I would hugely appreciate if you can point them in the right direction if they are wandering the corridors looking lost.
We are getting a bit tight for space and food for the course so I’m really sorry there aren’t any spare places – but please feel free to join us for a few drinks at Interval on Tuesday night or Uni Arms on Wednesday night (Orly and Filipa will be back!). We’ll make all the course material available afterwards too if you’d like to have a look at it.
Anna :)

Talk in APS on evolution of Japanese stickleback

Hello All,

A postdoctoral fellow who is visiting APS for the course next week will give a talk on Thursday about his work on the evolution of Japanese stickleback. He is also aiming to apply for a Marie Curie fellowship to work between Japan and my lab on this system.

Time: noon-1pm, Date: March 21st, Place: B52

title and abstract below, all are welcome, cheers,

Patrik

Ecological speciation and adaptive radiation in Japanese sticklebacks

Mark Ravinet
Queen’s University Belfast, UK; National Institute of Genetics, Mishima Japan

When species colonize new environments, they often undergo remarkable
diversification, occupying unexploited niches and evolving remarkable
adaptive phenotypic variation. Adaptive radiations driven by divergent
natural selection between habitats can therefore play a major role in
the evolution of biodiversity. Yet why is it that some species are
more prone to adaptive radiation than others? Over the last 10 years,
the stickleback species complex has become an evolutionary
‘supermodel’ for the study of rapid phenotypic adaptation and
speciation. Two highly divergent Japanese stickleback species occur
across the Japanese archipelago. The Japan Sea and Pacific Ocean forms
are unique in that they are the only known example of an anadromous
species pair and furthermore they experience near-complete
reproductive isolation. Curiously, only one lineage, the Pacific
Ocean, is able to colonize freshwater and therefore diversify
phenotypically. The Japanese stickleback system therefore provides an
excellent opportunity to study the role that ecological divergence has
played in shaping both speciation and the extent of adaptive
radiation.

APS Level 2 student looking for molecular experience

from Lewis Ottoway – please contact directly on <lottaway1@sheffield.ac.uk>

“I’m a second year undergraduate studying Zoology in the APS department. I am taking the module ‘ The Molecular Revolution in Biology’, and I’m starting to think a career in molecular biology may be for me. I’m particularly interested in wildlife forensics, gene function, the idea of transcription factor network research, and evolutionary genetics.

I’m aware that getting more experience in molecular labs would be a good thing, especially with the competitive job climate at the moment. Do you have or know of any openings where I could get some molecular lab experience the NERC biomolecular analysis centre, whether it be this year, for a short time over summer, or next year?”