Monthly Archives: December 2008

Free drinks vouchers

Dear All,

The Red Deer has kindly given us 50 free drinks vouchers which are valid til the end of January (despite what it says on them in small print). Not sure if you have to buy a meal to get a free drink or not – they didnt say that when I was given them. Anyways Ive left them in the locker you if anyone wants any.

Info on software “Papers”

Sick of that big pile of paper on your desk? Forgot in which article you read about that interesting experiment? Papers will revolutionize the way you deal with scientific papers. Search for papers using PubMed, directly retrieve and archive PDFs, and read and study them all from within Papers, your personal library of Science.

Download from: http://mekentosj.com/papers/

More software relevant for pD students from molecular biology backgrounds: http://mekentosj.com/programs/

10 post-doc positions in Uppsala

Dear colleague,  Below is an advertisement for 10 post-doc positions in Uppsala that   have been raised in connection with the establishment of the Uppsala   Centre for Evolution and Genomics (which is part of the Evolutionary   Biology Centre). Your help in forwarding this information to anyone   who you think could be interested would be very much appreciated.  Best wishes,  Hans    10 post-docs to Uppsala Centre for Evolution and Genomics  The Uppsala Centre for Evolution and Genomics (http://www.uceg.uu.se),   located at the Uppsala University Evolutionary Biology Centre (http://www.ebc.uu.se  ), has been established through a 10-years Centre of Excellence Grant   from the Swedish Research Council. The objective is to perform cutting-  edge basic research in the interphase of evolution and genomics,   studying the genomics of phenotypic diversity in natural populations.   Key questions include, for example, the genetic background to local   adaptation, speciation, large-scale morphological evolution and host-  parasite interactions. The Centre has an affiliated post-graduate   school program (http://www.ebc.uu.se/gradschool/), which offers   courses and activities for PhD students in this area. Director of the   Centre is Professor Hans Ellegren.  The Centre has various possibilities to recruit students as well as   more senior researchers and general inquiries about such possibilities   can be sent to the Director (Hans.Ellegren@ebc.uu.se). We now seek 10   highly motivated post-docs to take an active role in a number of   projects relating to bioinformatics, evolutionary biology, genomics   and molecular evolution. Specifics about each position are given   below, together with contact information to the responsible group   leader.  How to apply for any of these positions  Please email a statement of interest and research goals (2 pages max),   CV and list of publications to the host for the position you are   interested in. In addition, you should arrange to have 2 referees   email letters of recommendation to the host. If you are interested in   more than one position, please contact each host.  Speciation genetics  A postdoc position is available to study the genetics of speciation   using a natural hybrid zone of pied and collared flycatchers on the   Swedish islands of Öland and Gotland. We already have a pedigree   including more than 10.000 individual birds (collected during the last   30 years) and a large number of genetic markers available. This opens   the possibility of genetic approaches ranging from traditional   quantitative genetics to genome-wide association studies. The aim is   to answer central questions on the process of speciation from a   genomic perspective. For example, are the genes coding for ecological   and sexual isolation the same genes that are causing genetic   incompatibility? The project would be suitable for someone with a   strong interest in evolutionary biology in general and in speciation   or genetic related questions in particular. Previous experience in   quantitative genetics, QTL-mapping or bioinformatics would be   advantageous. Candidates should be able to work independently and have   good organizational skills.  Host: Anna Qvarnström (Anna.Qvarnstrom@ebc.uu.se)    Speciation genomics  Massive parallel sequencing provides outstanding possibilities for   detecting the genetic basis of adaptation, including those genome   characteristics that underlie speciation. Besides offering a route   toward the identification of “speciation genes” or “genomic island of   speciation”, the new technologies can be used to address the relative   importance of structural versus regulatory differences in adaptive   population divergence. The two songbird sister species pied and   collared collared flycatcher are important “ecological models” for   studies of speciation and life history evolution. We are seeking an   ambitious bioinformatics post-doc who, using a combination of data   from high-throughput short (Illumina Solexa) and medium (Roche 454)   next generation sequencing approaches, will analyse transcriptome as   well as full genome sequences from these species, with the ultimate   aim of identifying regions involved in their reproductive isolation.   The successful candidate needs to have a background in molecular   evolution and be well acquainted with the handling of large-scale DNA   sequence data.  Host: Hans Ellegren (Hans.Ellegren@ebc.uu.se)    Molecular evolution in social amoebas  A postdoctoral research position is offered to study molecular   evolution in social amoebae (Dictyostelia). Dictyostelids are   eukaryotic microbes residing at the borderline of true   multicellularity. They include one of the most widely studied   eukaryotic model organisms, Dictyostelium discoideum, whose recently   completed genome sequence reveals a number of unusual features. These   include extreme GC bias (~80%) and an abundance of repetitive DNA   including tandem triplet repeats in protein coding sequences (~35% of   predicted ORFs). We have recently completed the first molecular   phylogeny of Dictyostelia, which indicates that the group possesses   tremendous molecular depth. This suggests that genomic characteristics   must vary widely. The aim of the project will be to investigate the   evolution of various genomic trends across the group. The project is   suitable to someone with a strong interest in molecular evolution,   comparative genomics and/or protozoan systematics. Good molecular lab   skills, knowledge of molecular evolutionary theory and experience in   phylogenetic analysis are desirable.  Host: Sandra Baldauf (sandra.Baldauf@ebc.uu.se)    Vertebrate development  We are seeking a postdoctoral researcher to investigate genomic   aspects of morphological evolution in vertebrates. Preference will be   given to candidates interested in studying dermal bone formation in   lower vertebrates with reference to the zebrafish model system. Dermal   bone is the earliest type of bone to appear in vertebrate evolution.   It is primitively associated with dermal neuromast organs (lateral   lines) and complex internal vascularisation. We seek in the first   instance a researcher to investigate any aspect of the molecular   regulation of dermal bone development, but especially its relationship   to lateral line development, using the zebrafish model system in   combination with a genomic approach to comparisons with other   vertebrates. However, we are open to suggestions for projects dealing   with other aspects of morphogenesis that can utilise the zebrafish   system. We would expect the project to include a clear evolutionary/  comparative aspect that allows it to be linked into the broad   evolutionary umbrella of the department.  Host: Per Ahlberg (Per.Ahlberg@ebc.uu.se)    Genetics of plant adaptation  Postdoc to join a project exploring the genetic and functional basis   of adaptive differentiation among natural populations of Arabidopsis   thaliana. In this project, we have developed >500 recombinant inbred   lines (RIL) from a cross between an Italian and a Swedish population   that show strong long adaptation in reciprocal transplant experiments.   This represents an exceptional resource for exploring the genetic and   functional basis of adaptation to geographic variation in climate and   other abiotic and biotic factors affecting plant survival, growth and   reproduction. The project is based on a combination of genetic   analyses, field experiments in Sweden and Italy, and experiments   conducted under controlled conditions in the lab. It is a   collaborative project with Doug Schemske's lab at Michigan State   University, and the post-doc may spend part of his/her time in the   Schemske lab. Previous experience in population genetics, quantitative   genetics and QTL-mapping would be advantageous. Candidates should be   able to work independently and have good organizational skills.  Host: Jon Agren (Jon.Agren@ebc.uu.se)   Behavioural genomics  We seek a person experienced in quantitative genetics and, preferably,   QTL analysis, to join an exciting project aimed at identifying the   genetic basis of behavioural traits in zebra finches. The project is   collaboration with Wolfgang Forstmeier at the Max-Planck Institute for   Ornithology where a large pedigree of zebra finches has been   established and in which a number of behavioural traits, showing   moderate heritability, have been recorded. Several morphological   traits have been recorded as well, showing high heritability. Along   with this, our laboratory has developed a genetic map of the zebra   finch genome by the genotyping of 2,000 SNP markers in the birds used   for trait analysis. The data is now ready for QTL analysis, to allow   the identification of genomic regions contributing to the phenotypic   variation seen in the traits recorded. Subsequent work will zoom into   candidate regions, with the ultimate goal of identifying causative   genes or regulatory regions. The recently completed sequencing of the   zebra finch genome, coupled with the well-established use of zebra   finch as a model in behaviour and neurobiology, makes this a very   useful system to study behavioural genomics.    Host: Hans Ellegren (Hans.Ellegren@ebc.uu.se)    Bacterial host-adaptation processes  A post-doc position is available to study the genomics of bacterial   adaptations to invertebrate and vertebrate hosts. We have recently   completed the genome sequences of Wolbachia pipientis infecting   Drosophila simulans and Bartonella grahamii infecting wood mice. A   global collection of bacterial isolates from rodents is available for   studies of within-species heterogeneity. This opens the possibility to   study the co-evolution of host and endosymbiont genomes in trans-  infected hosts as well as in natural populations of flies and mice.   The aim is to study the mechanisms and evolutionary forces driving   rapidly changing phenotypes. The candidate should be able to handle   large volumes of sequence data. Previous experience in molecular   evolution, microbial genomics and programming is an advantage.  Host: Siv Andersson (Siv.Andersson@ebc.uu.se)    Glycosaminoglycans in the evolution of bilaterians  A postdoctoral position is available for an experienced molecular   biologist/developmental biologist for investigating the role of   glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the evolution of bilaterians. In the   extracellular space, GAGs are interacting with paracrine signalling   molecules such as proteins belonging to the FGF, BMP, Wnt and Hedgehog   families. Changes in location and amount of paracrine factors, which   is hypothesized to be major mechanisms of macroevolutionary change,   are influenced by GAG concentration and modifications. This project   aims to characterize general roles of GAGs in the development of   animals and ultimately how alterations in GAG biosynthesis influence   macroevolutionary change. The major experimental approach in this   project will be to study the role of GAGs for the development of   zebrafish embryos. Key regulating mechanisms of GAG biosynthesis will   be identified and their implication for developmental processes in   zebrafish characterized and put in a phylogenetic context. The chosen   candidate is encouraged to develop the project conceptually and   methodologically according to personal interests. Experience in   molecular developmental research, in particular in the zebrafish model   system, and/or bioinformatic expertise will be important for   consideration to this position.  Host: Per Ahlberg (Per.Ahlberg@ebc.uu.se)    Ecological genetics of adaptive variation in plants  Postdoc to join a project exploring the genetic basis and adaptive   significance of population differentiation along climatic gradients in   the outcrossing, perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata. In this project,   we will combine field studies with quantitative genetic analyses, QTL-  mapping and association studies to analyze the ecological and genetic   processes behind population differentiation and the genetic basis of   plant adaptation along environmental gradients. The aim is to   determine (a) the extent to which population differentiation in   morphology, phenology and life-history is adaptive, and can be related   to variation in the abiotic and biotic environment, and (b) the   genetic basis of local adaptation and variation in putatively adaptive   traits among and within populations. We will make use of available   genetic resources in the form of half-sib families produced in   controlled crosses, and segregating F2 populations produced through   among-population crosses. This project provides an opportunity to   combine state-of-the-art approaches in genomics with experimental work   under controlled conditions and in the natural habitats of the study   populations. Previous experience in population genetics/genomics,   quantitative genetics, or QTL-mapping would be advantageous.   Candidates should be able to work independently and have good   organizational skills. This project is run partly in collaboration   with Outi Savolainen at Oulu University.  Host: Jon Agren (Jon.Agren@ebc.uu.se)    Genetics of plant reproduction  Postdoc to join a project exploring the genetic basis and adaptive   significance of floral display and heterostyly in distylous Primula   farinosa, which is polymorphic for scape length and occurs in a short-  scaped and a long-scaped morph. Scape length strongly affects floral   display. In ongoing work, we have shown that the relative intensity of   interactions with pollinators, seed predators, and grazers determine   the mode and direction of selection on scape length through female   function. In this project, we will develop SNP and microsatellite   markers to allow quantification of selection through male function and   to produce a linkage map for Primula farinosa. We will also initiate   studies with the goal to determine the genetic basis of scape length   and heterostyly in this species. This project provides an opportunity   to combine state-of-the-art approaches in genomics with experimental   work under controlled conditions and in the natural habitats of the   study populations. Previous experience in population genetics/  genomics, or QTL-mapping would be advantageous. Candidates should be   able to work independently and have good organizational skills. This   project complements a project on biotic interactions and population   structure and dynamics of P. farinosa run in collaboration with Johan   Ehrlén at Stockholm University.  Host: Jon Agren (Jon.Agren@ebc.uu.se)    Professor Hans Ellegren Department of Evolutionary Biology Evolutionary Biology Centre Uppsala University Norbyvägen 18D SE-752 36 Uppsala Sweden  Phone: +46-18-4716460 Fax: +46-18-4716310 Email: Hans.Ellegren@ebc.uu.se Web: http://www.egs.uu.se/evbiol/Persons/Hans.html      ----- End forwarded message -----


Dear colleague,Below is an advertisement for 10 post-doc positions in Uppsala that have been raised in connection with the establishment of the Uppsala Centre for Evolution and Genomics (which is part of the Evolutionary Biology Centre). Your help in forwarding this information to anyone who you think could be interested would be very much appreciated.

Best wishes,

Hans

10 post-docs to Uppsala Centre for Evolution and GenomicsThe Uppsala Centre for Evolution and Genomics (http://www.uceg.uu.se), located at the Uppsala University Evolutionary Biology Centre (http://www.ebc.uu.se), has been established through a 10-years Centre of Excellence Grant from the Swedish Research Council. The objective is to perform cutting-edge basic research in the interphase of evolution and genomics, studying the genomics of phenotypic diversity in natural populations. Key questions include, for example, the genetic background to local adaptation, speciation, large-scale morphological evolution and host-parasite interactions. The Centre has an affiliated post-graduate school program (http://www.ebc.uu.se/gradschool/), which offers courses and activities for PhD students in this area. Director of the Centre is Professor Hans Ellegren. The Centre has various possibilities to recruit students as well as more senior researchers and general inquiries about such possibilities can be sent to the Director (Hans.Ellegren@ebc.uu.se). We now seek 10 highly motivated post-docs to take an active role in a number of projects relating to bioinformatics, evolutionary biology, genomics and molecular evolution. Specifics about each position are given below, together with contact information to the responsible group leader.How to apply for any of these positionsPlease email a statement of interest and research goals (2 pages max), CV and list of publications to the host for the position you are interested in. In addition, you should arrange to have 2 referees email letters of recommendation to the host. If you are interested in more than one position, please contact each host.Speciation geneticsA postdoc position is available to study the genetics of speciation using a natural hybrid zone of pied and collared flycatchers on the Swedish islands of Öland and Gotland. We already have a pedigree including more than 10.000 individual birds (collected during the last 30 years) and a large number of genetic markers available. This opens the possibility of genetic approaches ranging from traditional quantitative genetics to genome-wide association studies. The aim is to answer central questions on the process of speciation from a genomic perspective. For example, are the genes coding for ecological and sexual isolation the same genes that are causing genetic incompatibility? The project would be suitable for someone with a strong interest in evolutionary biology in general and in speciation or genetic related questions in particular. Previous experience in quantitative genetics, QTL-mapping or bioinformatics would be advantageous. Candidates should be able to work independently and have good organizational skills.Host: Anna Qvarnström (Anna.Qvarnstrom@ebc.uu.se)


Speciation genomics

Massive parallel sequencing provides outstanding possibilities for detecting the genetic basis of adaptation, including those genome characteristics that underlie speciation. Besides offering a route toward the identification of “speciation genes” or “genomic island of speciation”, the new technologies can be used to address the relative importance of structural versus regulatory differences in adaptive population divergence. The two songbird sister species pied and collared collared flycatcher are important “ecological models” for studies of speciation and life history evolution. We are seeking an ambitious bioinformatics post-doc who, using a combination of data from high-throughput short (Illumina Solexa) and medium (Roche 454) next generation sequencing approaches, will analyse transcriptome as well as full genome sequences from these species, with the ultimate aim of identifying regions involved in their reproductive isolation. The successful candidate needs to have a background in molecular evolution and be well acquainted with the handling of large-scale DNA sequence data.

Host: Hans Ellegren (Hans.Ellegren@ebc.uu.se)

 

Molecular evolution in social amoebas

A postdoctoral research position is offered to study molecular evolution in social amoebae (Dictyostelia). Dictyostelids are eukaryotic microbes residing at the borderline of true multicellularity. They include one of the most widely studied eukaryotic model organisms, Dictyostelium discoideum, whose recently completed genome sequence reveals a number of unusual features. These include extreme GC bias (~80%) and an abundance of repetitive DNA including tandem triplet repeats in protein coding sequences (~35% of predicted ORFs). We have recently completed the first molecular phylogeny of Dictyostelia, which indicates that the group possesses tremendous molecular depth. This suggests that genomic characteristics must vary widely. The aim of the project will be to investigate the evolution of various genomic trends across the group. The project is suitable to someone with a strong interest in molecular evolution, comparative genomics and/or protozoan systematics. Good molecular lab skills, knowledge of molecular evolutionary theory and experience in phylogenetic analysis are desirable.Host: Sandra Baldauf (sandra.Baldauf@ebc.uu.se) Vertebrate developmentWe are seeking a postdoctoral researcher to investigate genomic aspects of morphological evolution in vertebrates. Preference will be given to candidates interested in studying dermal bone formation in lower vertebrates with reference to the zebrafish model system. Dermal bone is the earliest type of bone to appear in vertebrate evolution. It is primitively associated with dermal neuromast organs (lateral lines) and complex internal vascularisation. We seek in the first instance a researcher to investigate any aspect of the molecular regulation of dermal bone development, but especially its relationship to lateral line development, using the zebrafish model system in combination with a genomic approach to comparisons with other vertebrates. However, we are open to suggestions for projects dealing with other aspects of morphogenesis that can utilise the zebrafish system. We would expect the project to include a clear evolutionary/comparative aspect that allows it to be linked into the broad evolutionary umbrella of the department.Host: Per Ahlberg (Per.Ahlberg@ebc.uu.se) 

Genetics of plant adaptation

Postdoc to join a project exploring the genetic and functional basis of adaptive differentiation among natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana. In this project, we have developed >500 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) from a cross between an Italian and a Swedish population that show strong long adaptation in reciprocal transplant experiments. This represents an exceptional resource for exploring the genetic and functional basis of adaptation to geographic variation in climate and other abiotic and biotic factors affecting plant survival, growth and reproduction. The project is based on a combination of genetic analyses, field experiments in Sweden and Italy, and experiments conducted under controlled conditions in the lab. It is a collaborative project with Doug Schemske’s lab at Michigan State University, and the post-doc may spend part of his/her time in the Schemske lab. Previous experience in population genetics, quantitative genetics and QTL-mapping would be advantageous. Candidates should be able to work independently and have good organizational skills.Host: Jon Agren (Jon.Agren@ebc.uu.se)


 

Behavioural genomics

We seek a person experienced in quantitative genetics and, preferably, QTL analysis, to join an exciting project aimed at identifying the genetic basis of behavioural traits in zebra finches. The project is collaboration with Wolfgang Forstmeier at the Max-Planck Institute for Ornithology where a large pedigree of zebra finches has been established and in which a number of behavioural traits, showing moderate heritability, have been recorded. Several morphological traits have been recorded as well, showing high heritability. Along with this, our laboratory has developed a genetic map of the zebra finch genome by the genotyping of 2,000 SNP markers in the birds used for trait analysis. The data is now ready for QTL analysis, to allow the identification of genomic regions contributing to the phenotypic variation seen in the traits recorded. Subsequent work will zoom into candidate regions, with the ultimate goal of identifying causative genes or regulatory regions. The recently completed sequencing of the zebra finch genome, coupled with the well-established use of zebra finch as a model in behaviour and neurobiology, makes this a very useful system to study behavioural genomics. Host: Hans Ellegren (Hans.Ellegren@ebc.uu.se)


Bacterial host-adaptation processesA post-doc position is available to study the genomics of bacterial adaptations to invertebrate and vertebrate hosts. We have recently completed the genome sequences of Wolbachia pipientis infecting Drosophila simulans and Bartonella grahamii infecting wood mice. A global collection of bacterial isolates from rodents is available for studies of within-species heterogeneity. This opens the possibility to study the co-evolution of host and endosymbiont genomes in trans-infected hosts as well as in natural populations of flies and mice. The aim is to study the mechanisms and evolutionary forces driving rapidly changing phenotypes. The candidate should be able to handle large volumes of sequence data. Previous experience in molecular evolution, microbial genomics and programming is an advantage.Host: Siv Andersson (Siv.Andersson@ebc.uu.se) Glycosaminoglycans in the evolution of bilateriansA postdoctoral position is available for an experienced molecular biologist/developmental biologist for investigating the role of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the evolution of bilaterians. In the extracellular space, GAGs are interacting with paracrine signalling molecules such as proteins belonging to the FGF, BMP, Wnt and Hedgehog families. Changes in location and amount of paracrine factors, which is hypothesized to be major mechanisms of macroevolutionary change, are influenced by GAG concentration and modifications. This project aims to characterize general roles of GAGs in the development of animals and ultimately how alterations in GAG biosynthesis influence macroevolutionary change. The major experimental approach in this project will be to study the role of GAGs for the development of zebrafish embryos. Key regulating mechanisms of GAG biosynthesis will be identified and their implication for developmental processes in zebrafish characterized and put in a phylogenetic context. The chosen candidate is encouraged to develop the project conceptually and methodologically according to personal interests. Experience in molecular developmental research, in particular in the zebrafish model system, and/or bioinformatic expertise will be important for consideration to this position.Host: Per Ahlberg (Per.Ahlberg@ebc.uu.se)


Ecological genetics of adaptive variation in plants

Postdoc to join a project exploring the genetic basis and adaptive significance of population differentiation along climatic gradients in the outcrossing, perennial herb Arabidopsis lyrata. In this project, we will combine field studies with quantitative genetic analyses, QTL-mapping and association studies to analyze the ecological and genetic processes behind population differentiation and the genetic basis of plant adaptation along environmental gradients. The aim is to determine (a) the extent to which population differentiation in morphology, phenology and life-history is adaptive, and can be related to variation in the abiotic and biotic environment, and (b) the genetic basis of local adaptation and variation in putatively adaptive traits among and within populations. We will make use of available genetic resources in the form of half-sib families produced in controlled crosses, and segregating F2 populations produced through among-population crosses. This project provides an opportunity to combine state-of-the-art approaches in genomics with experimental work under controlled conditions and in the natural habitats of the study populations. Previous experience in population genetics/genomics, quantitative genetics, or QTL-mapping would be advantageous. Candidates should be able to work independently and have good organizational skills. This project is run partly in collaboration with Outi Savolainen at Oulu University.

Host: Jon Agren (Jon.Agren@ebc.uu.se)


Genetics of plant reproduction

Postdoc to join a project exploring the genetic basis and adaptive significance of floral display and heterostyly in distylous Primula farinosa, which is polymorphic for scape length and occurs in a short-scaped and a long-scaped morph. Scape length strongly affects floral display. In ongoing work, we have shown that the relative intensity of interactions with pollinators, seed predators, and grazers determine the mode and direction of selection on scape length through female function. In this project, we will develop SNP and microsatellite markers to allow quantification of selection through male function and to produce a linkage map for Primula farinosa. We will also initiate studies with the goal to determine the genetic basis of scape length and heterostyly in this species. This project provides an opportunity to combine state-of-the-art approaches in genomics with experimental work under controlled conditions and in the natural habitats of the study populations. Previous experience in population genetics/genomics, or QTL-mapping would be advantageous. Candidates should be able to work independently and have good organizational skills. This project complements a project on biotic interactions and population structure and dynamics of P. farinosa run in collaboration with Johan Ehrlén at Stockholm University.Host: Jon Agren (Jon.Agren@ebc.uu.se) 

Professor Hans Ellegren

Department of Evolutionary Biology

Evolutionary Biology Centre

Uppsala University

Norbyvägen 18D

SE-752 36 Uppsala

Sweden

Phone: +46-18-4716460

Fax: +46-18-4716310

Email: Hans.Ellegren@ebc.uu.se

Web: http://www.egs.uu.se/evbiol/Persons/Hans.html


Date change: Mol Ecol Lab Group Meeting

The next Mol Ecol Lab Group meeting will be in THURSDAY 8th Jan (not the 6th as in previous post) 10-11am in B52. Juan and Jake will be speaking about their research.

Next TAB Group Meeting – first of the year Fri 9/1/09 10am B52

Hi all,

the next TAB Group meeting – and first of 2009 – will be on Friday 9th January 10am.

Merry Christmas to all those going home or away this weekend!

Celine

TAB Group Meeting – Friday 12/12 – 10-11.30 B52

Dear all,

earlier time of 10am for tomorrow’s Terry group meeting.

Celine

Lab Xmas dinner tonight

On the attached document is what everyone is having tonight in case anyone has forgotten – someone has dropped out so there is a spare place with…

Leek and Potato Soup, Vegetable & Stilton Crumble and Xmas pud – if anyone wants it please let me know asap (or Ill cancel it at 4.30pm).

 The meal is booked for 6.30 so please be there a little before.

Postdoc, Roslin, Scotland – 4 years – systems biology/bioinformatics/informatics skills.

See attached doc roslin-postdoc.doc  for more info.

Celine

Santa’s sack is ready in B54

Dear all,

Santas sack is ready and waiting in the B54 foyer. Please could you add your present by Wed 4pm.

 If any kind elves want to help carry the presents and have a drink in the pub before the meal that would be great.

PhD studentship in evolutionary ecology and conservation at University of Otago, NZ

Message from Shinichi:

More details

To apply: contact Shinichi by email (shinichi.nakagawa@otago.ac.nz; email subject should say “Trojan fish PhD”). Send CV including academic records and names and contacts of 3 referees.

#############

Shinichi Nakagawa(-Lagisz), PhD
Lecturer of Behavioural Ecology, Department of Zoology,
University of Otago,
340 Great King Street
P O Box 56
Dunedin, New Zealand
Tel: +64-3-479-5046
Fax: +64-3-479-7584
Email1: shinichi.nakagawa@otago.ac.nz
Email2: itchyshin@yahoo.co.nz