Category Archives: Uncategorized

Genomics Technician – Fixed Term (6 months)

Genomics Technician – Full time/ Fixed Term – 6 months

Location: Edinburgh Zoo

Are you passionate about genetics and conservation? We’re looking for a Genomics Technician to undertake genetic and genomic work, preparing and analysing DNA and to contribute to the day to day running of our Wildgenes Laboratory facility at Edinburgh Zoo.

The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) are seeking a Genomics Technician to perform wet-lab molecular genetic techniques and assist the Senior Technician with the organisation and running of the Wildgenes lab. This is an exciting opportunity to further your career with one of Scotland’s leading education and conservation charities for a six-month fixed term period based at RZSS Edinburgh Zoo.

What you’ll be doing…

The Conservation Wildgenes team are responsible for conducting cutting-edge conservation genetic and genomic research on a large range of threatened taxa and working alongside government agencies, conservation charities and zoos across the world to deliver data, advice, training and capacity building. Essentially, as Genomics Technician, you can expect to:

Undertake DNA extraction, amplification, analysis and archiving of samples
Works within clearly defined processes and supervision
Troubleshoot and optimise procedures and produce protocols as required
This is a 6-month full time fixed term post where the working hours are 37.5 hours per week.

https://www.rzss.org.uk/job-vacancies/genomics-technician-fixed-term-6-months/

Ecological genetics group

Registration is now open but will be closing soon for this year’s annual Ecological Genetics Group meeting, in association with the British Ecological Society and Genetics Society. Getting registering so you don’t miss out!

This year’s conference is to be held on the 16th to the 18th of April at the stunning Downing College, University of Cambridge. There will be a full scientific and social programme throughout the conference to bring together those with an interest in population genetics and ecology and evolution. The programme will include a series of talks and a poster session on relevant topics including talks by our two confirmed guest speaks,

Dr Matt Davey, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Cambridge

https://www.plantsci.cam.ac.uk/directory/davey-matthew

And Prof Bill Amos, Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge

https://www.zoo.cam.ac.uk/directory/william-amos

There will also be the opportunity for a behind the scenes tour of the Sainsbury Laboratory Herbarium at the University. A collection dating back 300 years that will allow you to get up close to specimens collected by the Grandfathers of evolutionary theory, Darwin and Wallace. The Cambridge Genomics Services will a be holding a Genomics and Bioinformatics session to help with all your Next-Gen needs. And our postgrad student workshop this year it will be on ‘How to review a paper.’

Let us not forget the now famous EGG-Heads quiz which will be held after the conference dinner.

Full Conference details can be found here

https://www.britishecologicalsociety.org/event/ecological-genetics-group-63rd-annual-meeting/

Room available

Room available in a shared house with three PhD students. Located in Hunters Bar with a view to Endcliffe park. Available from April until end of June £325 pcm.
Big house in a quiet and green neighborhood, with two living rooms, two toilets, kitchen and garden.
Space for parking on the street is available.
For more details contact Clarissa Carvalho: cferreiradecarvalho1@sheffield.ac.uk

Accommodation available

2 bed house in quiet street in Crookes available April – September (six month
contract) £570 pcm.
Kitchen, living room, bathroom, main bedroom and open plan attic room.
Parking space and patio garden.
20 minute walk to University of Shefeld.
Would suit a single person or couple.
For more details contact Tamora James: tdjames1@shefeld.ac.uk

Identifying barriers to gene flow in the genome

We are pleased to announce the SMBE Satellite Meeting and Workshop on ‘Identifying barriers to gene flow in the genome’ to be held **17th-19th June 2019** at the Marine Biology Laboratory, Tjärnö, Sweden.

Speciation genomics is a fast moving and rapidly changing field. Genome scans and demographic inference are popular tools for studying how barriers to gene flow evolve and how species diverge, but the field has only recently begun to take into account confounding factors that might bias these methods.

If standard approaches are insufficient for identifying barriers to gene flow and understanding the processes involved in speciation, where do we go next? One way forward is the use of sophisticated approaches to jointly infer signals of selection, gene flow and demographic history. We can also use efficient simulation to introduce greater statistical rigour to our approaches.

This three day workshop/meeting on speciation genomics will combine talks from invited speakers and participants, a discussion panel and a hands-on workshop to learn how to use a composite likelihood approach to infer selection, gene flow and demography from genome scan data.

Invited speakers include:
* Reto Burri (University of Jena)
* Jonna Kulmuni (University of Helsinki)
* Kelley Harris (University of Washington)
* Simon Aeschbacher (University of Zurich)
* Frederic Guillaume (University of Zurich)

The practical workshop will be led by Jerome Kelleher (Big Data Institute, Oxford) (the importance of simulations) and Konrad Lohse (University of Edinburgh). Some basic experience in Unix, and Python programming is necessary but we provide links to resources on our website: https://smbespeciationgenomics.github.io/

There is space for approximately 40-50 participants. To apply, please register at https://smbespeciationgenomics.github.io//register/. The deadline for applications is 25th February 2019.

It is free to register but attendance will cost $300 (US) to cover accommodation and food for the three days. Travel bursaries are available for MSc and PhD students wishing to attend.

We encourage participants from all backgrounds and levels to apply and we look forward to welcoming you to Sweden in June!

https://smbespeciationgenomics.github.io/

Mark Ravinet, Marina Rafajlovi?, Michael Matschiner, Simon Martin, Chris Jiggins & Markus Möst

PhD in Evolutionary Biology, University of Bern, Switzerland

A fully funded PhD position (3-4 years) is open for an enthusiastic young researcher to work in the group of Aquatic Ecology & Evolution, led by Prof. Ole Seehausen, at the University of Bern and the Eawag Centre for Ecology, Evolution & Biogeochemistry in Kastanienbaum, Switzerland.

The project will explore 15,000 years of evolution and ecosystem dynamics in Lake Victoria, East Africa, as reconstructed from sediment cores, fossils and ancient DNA. This Swiss NSF Sinergia project is a cooperation between U Bern, EAWAG (Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology), the Centre for Geogenetics at U of Copenhagen, Denmark, the Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute, U of Arizona, U Massachusetts and others.

The group of Ole Seehausen focusses on the phenotypic and genomic evolution of Lake Victoria’s super-diverse cichlid fish radiation. The PhD in evolutionary biology and paleogenetics will investigate the evolution of the cichlid radiation through study of time series of fossils and ancient DNA. We want to understand how the ecological and phenotypic diversity changed through time, how genetic variation arose and got assembled into new species in the course of the adaptive radiation.

This is one of 4 PhD and several Postdoc positions in the project. In close collaboration with ecologists, paleo-ecologists and paleo-genomics researchers, we want to address how the evolutionary diversification of the cichlid fish interacted with the Lake Victoria ecosystem. The student will analyse subfossil remains of cichlid fish from sediment cores for their morphology and ancient DNA content. Extensive reference collections of modern cichlids and their genome sequences will be available to aid interpretation of fossil phenotypes and ancient DNA data. The PhD will be co-supervised by Dr. Moritz Muschick.

Ideally, the candidate has extensive prior training in molecular genetic techniques, statistical shape analysis, computational analysis of genomic sequence data, or evolutionary biology. The candidate is motivated to learn and apply advanced laboratory techniques and to work independently. The group’s working language is English and fluency in writing and speaking is required. Knowledge of German or French is not required.

Besides Uni Bern, the student will spend time at Eawag’s Centre for Ecology, Evolution & Biogeochemistry. The Centre is located at Lake Lucerne and is a strong nucleus of Eawag research groups aimed at integrating evolutionary biology, community ecology, and ecosystem science
http://www.eawag.ch/forschung/cc/ceeb/index_EN.

Supervisor: Prof. Dr. Ole Seehausen, Institute of Ecology and Evolution
Salary: Swiss NSF PhD Fellowship (47,000 to 50,000 CHF, 100%).
The position is available from March 1, 2019 (for 3-4 years).
Review of applications starts on January 20, 2019 and continues until the position is filled.
Please direct inquiries to Prof. Dr. Ole Seehausen, ole.seehausen@iee.unibe.ch.
Applications: One pdf file only, with CV, letter of motivation, if applicable transcript of MSc with grades, publication list, and contact details of three referees should be send by email to therese.oesch@iee.unibe.ch

Postdoc on asexual reproduction in aphids

A 18-month postdoctoral position is available in the team Ecology and
Genetics of Insects (https://www6.rennes.inra.fr/igepp_eng/Researchteams/
Ecology-and-Genetics-of-Insects), at INRA, Rennes, France, starting in
June 2019.

Contact Julie.Jaquiery@inra.fr or Jean-Christophe.Simon@inra.fr before 15 Feb 19

PhD position – University of Kent

Title: Investigating the co-evolution of chromosome organisation and gene expression in ruminants

Closing date: 18th January 2019

Project Description

Our lab aims to study genome evolution and the genetic changes associated with individual and species differences, applying the newest comparative and functional genomic techniques and the great wealth of genomic data available. In particular, we focus on the dynamics of chromosomal evolution in mammals and other vertebrates. To address these questions, we use rodents and ruminants as model species and take a multidisciplinary approach that combines experimental and bioinformatic analysis.

This project will focus particularly on how genomic changes between closely related ruminant species might affect gene expression. To do so, the student will first detect genomic changes in ruminants using an algorithm designed in our lab. Then, they will generate and analyse RNA-Seq data for cattle, sheep and red deer, to finally integrate their results with the gross genomic changes.

The candidate: We are seeking a highly motivated individual, excited by the prospect of conducting cutting-edge research, with a minimum of 2:1 degree in a relevant subject. She/he will have a strong willingness to work at the interface of wet-lab and bioinformatics, and demonstrate enthusiasm to learn new skills.

Informal enquiries can be sent at – m.farre-belmonte@kent.ac.uk

How to apply: Applications can be made using the online University application page where the project title should be entered as the proposed area of research and Dr Marta Farré Belmonte as supervisor. Please include a CV and a cover letter. https://www.kent.ac.uk/courses/postgraduate/how-to-apply/#research

Postdoc and PhD place in Bangor

PDRA: http://labadopulos.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/pdra-flyer2.pdf

phd: http://labadopulos.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/PHD-flyer.pdf

Research Scientist position at Edinburgh Zoo

see

http://www.rzss.org.uk/job-vacancies/research-scientist-conservation-genetics

The role

An opportunity has arisen for a committed researcher to join the Royal Zoological Society of Scotland WildGenes lab. Reporting to the Conservation Programme Manager – WildGenes in our Conservation team, the successful candidate will initiate, implement and disseminate conservation genetics projects in the WildGenes laboratory. Duties include assisting with the project management and analysis of genetic data for a diverse portfolio of conservation genetic projects.

This is a full-time permanent position where the working hours are 37.5 hours per week.

Closing date: Wednesday 2nd January 2019.